El salvador de ubeda

El salvador de ubeda

Chapel of the savior ubeda schedules

Commissioned in 1536, it was part of an extensive artistic program (which included his Palace, a University and a Hospital)[1] aimed at exalting the fame, fortune and personal glory achieved by Charles V’s personal secretary, for which he resorted to first-rate artists. The initial project was entrusted to the Burgos-born Diego de Siloé, while the work was carried out by Andrés de Vandelvira from 1540 onwards. The temple was consecrated in 1559. Its first chaplain was Deán Ortega, for whom the large palace on the left of the chapel’s main façade was built.
Siloé, following Vitrubio, applied neo-Pythagorean principles to the plans, which determined for the central nave a length of eighty rod feet (just over 22 meters) and a width of 40 feet (about eleven meters), and a height of 100 feet (about twenty-eight meters).
One of the most interesting features of the architectural decoration of El Salvador, which is typical of the Vandelviresque school, is the use of the human figure as an architectural member: caryatids (female figures), atlantes or telamones (male), hermas (dismembered), etc. These motifs must have been contributions of Esteban Jamete, a native of Orleans, since these figures were in vogue in French architecture at the time.

Wikipedia

Commissioned in 1536, it was part of an extensive artistic program (which included his Palace, a University and a Hospital)[1] aimed at exalting the fame, fortune and personal glory achieved by Charles V’s personal secretary, for which he resorted to first-class artists. The initial project was entrusted to the Burgos-born Diego de Siloé, while the work was carried out by Andrés de Vandelvira from 1540 onwards. The temple was consecrated in 1559. Its first chaplain was Deán Ortega, for whom the large palace on the left of the chapel’s main façade was built.
Siloé, following Vitrubio, applied neo-Pythagorean principles to the plans, which determined for the central nave a length of eighty rod feet (just over 22 meters) and a width of 40 feet (about eleven meters), and a height of 100 feet (about twenty-eight meters).
One of the most interesting features of the architectural decoration of El Salvador, which is typical of the Vandelviresque school, is the use of the human figure as an architectural member: caryatids (female figures), atlantes or telamones (male), hermas (dismembered), etc. These motifs must have been contributions of Esteban Jamete, a native of Orleans, since these figures were in vogue in French architecture at the time.

House of medinaceli

PLAN AND ARCHITECTURAL ORGANIZATION: Siloé’s plan combines a grandiose and symbolic circular rotunda, inspired by the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, and a rectangle that forms a longitudinal nave reminiscent of Roman basilicas.
The basilical part is divided into three bays covered by vaulted vaults decorated with false ribs. Each bay is delimited by Corinthian columns of gigantic order on pedestals that house chapels-horns between their buttresses. In the chapels there were sculptures, relics, gold work and paintings, mostly from Italy, donated by its founder, which were either destroyed in the Civil War or moved to other places.
The SacristyNext to the Main Chapel, the sacristy opens through an arch in esviaje, flanked by canéforas that rest on decorated vases. Designed by Vandelvira, Dean Ortega was its iconographic promoter and Esteban Jamete its architect.    The sacristy, which has a rectangular floor plan, is structured in three sections covered by vaulted vaults. Its decorative program includes tondos with male and female busts representing the passions, caryatids and Atlanteans dressed in the Hebraic, Oriental and Greco-Roman manner, sibyls, figures with the family heraldry and apocalyptic angels.

Sacred chapel of the savior

Commissioned in 1536, it was part of an extensive artistic program (which included his Palace, a University and a Hospital)[1] aimed at exalting the fame, fortune and personal glory achieved by Charles V’s personal secretary, for which he resorted to first-rate artists. The initial project was entrusted to the Burgos-born Diego de Siloé, while the work was carried out by Andrés de Vandelvira from 1540 onwards. The temple was consecrated in 1559. Its first chaplain was Deán Ortega, for whom the large palace on the left of the chapel’s main façade was built.
Siloé, following Vitrubio, applied neo-Pythagorean principles to the plans, which determined for the central nave a length of eighty rod feet (just over 22 meters) and a width of 40 feet (about eleven meters), and a height of 100 feet (about twenty-eight meters).
One of the most interesting features of the architectural decoration of El Salvador, which is typical of the Vandelviresque school, is the use of the human figure as an architectural member: caryatids (female figures), atlantes or telamones (male), hermas (dismembered), etc. These motifs must have been contributions of Esteban Jamete, a native of Orleans, since these figures were in vogue in French architecture at the time.

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