Jose de ribera cuadros

Jose de ribera cuadros

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In later centuries, the appreciation of Ribera’s art was conditioned by a black legend that presented him as a fateful and unpleasant painter, who obsessively painted themes of martyrdom with a gruesome verism. One writer affirmed that «Ribera used to paint with his brush in the blood of the saints». This mistaken idea was imposed in the 18th and 19th centuries, partly by foreign writers who did not know all of his production. In reality, Ribera evolved from the initial tenebrismu to a more luminous and colorful style, influenced by Venetian Renaissance and ancient sculpture, and he knew how to depict with equal success the beautiful and the trivial.
Ribera’s first youthful works generally accepted as autographs are four oil paintings from a series of The Five Senses (ca. 1615), which are now on display in four different collections: Franz Mayer Museum (Mexico City), Norton Simon Museum (Pasadena), Wadsworth Atheneum (Hartford, USA) and Juan Abelló Collection (Madrid). A large painting, The Resurrection of Lazarus (ca. 1616), was acquired by the Prado Museum in 2001, when its authorship was still disputed. It is also worth mentioning a Martyrdom of St. Lawrence authenticated in the Basilica of Pilar in Zaragoza and a rare example of female nude, Susana and the Old Ones (Madrid, private property). The Borghese Gallery in Rome has The Judgment of Solomon, a work that was attributed to an anonymous artist and that when it was assigned to Ribera, he indirectly left several other works to him. A relevant painting of St. Martin sharing his cape with a test tube, painted in Parma, was lost, although a copy of it survives.

francisco de zurbaránspanish painter

In later centuries, the appreciation of Ribera’s art was conditioned by a black legend that presented him as a fateful and unpleasant painter, who obsessively painted themes of martyrdom with a truculent verism. One writer affirmed that «Ribera used to paint with his brush in the blood of the saints». This mistaken idea was imposed in the 18th and 19th centuries, partly by foreign writers who did not know all of his production. In reality, Ribera evolved from the initial tenebrismu to a more luminous and colorful style, influenced by Venetian Renaissance and ancient sculpture, and he knew how to depict with equal success the beautiful and the trivial.
Ribera’s first youthful works generally accepted as autographs are four oil paintings from a series of The Five Senses (ca. 1615), which are now on display in four different collections: Franz Mayer Museum (Mexico City), Norton Simon Museum (Pasadena), Wadsworth Atheneum (Hartford, USA) and Juan Abelló Collection (Madrid). A large painting, The Resurrection of Lazarus (ca. 1616), was acquired by the Prado Museum in 2001, when its authorship was still disputed. It is also worth mentioning a Martyrdom of St. Lawrence authenticated in the Basilica of Pilar in Zaragoza and a rare example of female nude, Susana and the Old Ones (Madrid, private property). The Borghese Gallery in Rome has The Judgment of Solomon, a work that was attributed to an anonymous artist and that when it was assigned to Ribera, he indirectly left several other works to him. A relevant painting of St. Martin sharing his cape with a test tube, painted in Parma, was lost, although a copy of it survives.

francisco de zurbarán

The canvas, of eventful history, belonged in the seventeenth century to the Marquis of Leganés, who gave it to King Philip IV. The latter, in turn, deposited it in the monastery of El Escorial, where it remained until the French invasion, during which Joseph Bonaparte gave it to Marshal Soult, whose descendants acquired it to the museum.
The beautiful Penitent Magdalene is a replica of the one in the Prado Museum that is part of a series of four in which youth and old age in man and woman are contrasted, two by two. To the Magdalena corresponds St. John the Baptist as an adolescent and to St. Mary Egyptian is contrasted St. Bartholomew.
Alfonso E. Perez Sanchez. Museum of Fine Arts of Bilbao : guide. Bilbao : Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao = Bilboko Arte Ederretako Museoa, 2011 (1st ed. 2006; English ed.; French ed.; Basque ed.), pp. 56-57, no. 39a, ad vocem.
Carmen Espinosa Martín. «El retrato-miniatura en el Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao» in Urtekaria 1989 : asterlanak, albistak = yearbook 1989 : studies, chronicles. Bilbao : Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao = Bilboko Arte Ederretako Museoa, 1990, p. 110.

magdalena penitente josé de ribera

In later centuries, the appreciation of Ribera’s art was conditioned by a black legend that presented him as a fateful and unpleasant painter, who obsessively painted themes of martyrdom with a truculent verism. One writer affirmed that «Ribera used to paint with his brush in the blood of the saints». This mistaken idea was imposed in the 18th and 19th centuries, partly by foreign writers who did not know all of his production. In reality, Ribera evolved from the initial tenebrismu to a more luminous and colorful style, influenced by Venetian Renaissance and ancient sculpture, and he knew how to depict with equal success the beautiful and the trivial.
Ribera’s first youthful works generally accepted as autographs are four oil paintings from a series of The Five Senses (ca. 1615), which are now on display in four different collections: Franz Mayer Museum (Mexico City), Norton Simon Museum (Pasadena), Wadsworth Atheneum (Hartford, USA) and Juan Abelló Collection (Madrid). A large painting, The Resurrection of Lazarus (ca. 1616), was acquired by the Prado Museum in 2001, when its authorship was still disputed. It is also worth mentioning a Martyrdom of St. Lawrence authenticated in the Basilica of Pilar in Zaragoza and a rare example of female nude, Susana and the Old Ones (Madrid, private property). The Borghese Gallery in Rome has The Judgment of Solomon, a work that was attributed to an anonymous artist and that when it was assigned to Ribera, he indirectly left several other works to him. A relevant painting of St. Martin sharing his cape with a test tube, painted in Parma, was lost, although a copy of it survives.

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