Leonardo la virgen de las rocas

Leonardo la virgen de las rocas

Controversy in the louvre museum

This one dates from April 25, 1483 and is signed by the prior of the Milanese Confraternity of the Immaculate Conception and the brothers Evangelista and Giovanni Ambrogio de Predis who were commissioned to make the side panels, with angels, of the altarpiece that the monks intended to place on the main altar of the chapel of that institution in the church of San Francesco Grande in Milan.

However, as time went by, while the work was being finished, there were financial disagreements between the friars and the artists of the altarpiece. The long dispute ended in 1506, when the friars were paid what the experts had established and the others installed the triptych in their main altar.

The one in the National Gallery is considered to have been painted between 1492 and 1508 and points to a more mature style of Da Vinci. If the authorship of the first one is not questioned, almost all experts agree that this one must have been painted with the help of other artists. There are also those who believe it unlikely that the work is by Da Vinci.

The national gallery dissects the madonna of the rocks of

On April 25, 1483, with the painter brothers Evangelista and Giovanni Ambrogio de Predis, on the one hand, and Bartolomeo Scorione, prior of the Confraternity of the Immaculate Conception, on the other, the contract for an altarpiece to be placed on the altar of the chapel of that institution in the church of San Francesco Grande in Milan was stipulated. This chapel had been founded in the 14th century by Beatrice d’Este, wife of Ludovico Sforza, and was destroyed in 1576.

There is a theory that during this long financial dispute with the Brotherhood, Leonardo sold this original work for 400 lire to a private client, perhaps the French King Louis XII. It is also widely hypothesized that the panel was a gift from Ludovico the Moor to Maximilian I of Habsburg when he married Blanca Maria Sforza, so the panel would have been in Innsbruck before passing to France as another wedding gift, this time from Leonor of Austria, daughter of Philip the Fair and Joan the Mad and, therefore, granddaughter of Maximilian, who married Francis I.

20 creations of leonardo da vinci

On April 25, 1483, with the painter brothers Evangelista and Giovanni Ambrogio de Predis, on the one hand, and Bartolomeo Scorione, prior of the Confraternity of the Immaculate Conception, on the other, a contract was drawn up for an altarpiece to be placed on the altar of the chapel of that institution in the church of San Francesco Grande in Milan. This chapel had been founded in the 14th century by Beatrice d’Este, wife of Ludovico Sforza, and was destroyed in 1576.

There is a theory that during this long financial dispute with the Brotherhood, Leonardo sold this original work for 400 lire to a private client, perhaps the French King Louis XII. It is also widely hypothesized that the panel was a gift from Ludovico the Moor to Maximilian I of Habsburg when he married Blanca Maria Sforza, so the panel would have been in Innsbruck before passing to France as another wedding gift, this time from Leonor of Austria, daughter of Philip the Fair and Joan the Mad and, therefore, granddaughter of Maximilian, who married Francis I.

The smile and the intertwined – leonardo da vinci

On April 25, 1483, with the painter brothers Evangelista and Giovanni Ambrogio de Predis, on the one hand, and Bartolomeo Scorione, prior of the Confraternity of the Immaculate Conception, on the other, the contract for an altarpiece to be placed on the altar of the chapel of that institution in the church of San Francesco Grande in Milan was stipulated. This chapel had been founded in the 14th century by Beatrice d’Este, wife of Ludovico Sforza, and was destroyed in 1576.

There is a theory that during this long financial dispute with the Brotherhood, Leonardo sold this original work for 400 lire to a private client, perhaps the French King Louis XII. It is also widely hypothesized that the panel was a gift from Ludovico the Moor to Maximilian I of Habsburg when he married Blanca Maria Sforza, so the panel would have been in Innsbruck before passing to France as another wedding gift, this time from Leonor of Austria, daughter of Philip the Fair and Joan the Mad and, therefore, granddaughter of Maximilian, who married Francis I.

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